Amy’s Baking Company And Its Reputation Management

If you’ve been browsing our site and have read our latest articles, then you are aware of the Kitchen Nightmares Season 6 finale that focused on Amy’s Baking Company; a locally owned Scottsdale, Arizona eatery. Even TV viewers who normally don’t tune in to cooking shows seem to have been drawn to the drama laden episode which showed flaws and highly questionable management tactics by the diner’s two owners: Samy and Amy Bouzaglo.

Following a debacle that highlighted everything from store-bought frozen food (that was advertised as “fresh”) to wait staff not receiving the tips that customers left, it seemed that the future of ABC would be short lived. In case you haven’t heard of the scenario, here’s a screenshot (taken from Friday, June 14th) of Google News Search Results for Amy’s Baking Company.

Amys Baking Company Google News Query

Kitchen Nightmares Season 6 Finale

From the beginning of the final episode of this year’s Kitchen Nightmares featuring Gordon Ramsay, the owners stated they had been plagued by negative online reviews from “haters” and bloggers who had criticized the diner’s food as well as the owner’s treatment of customers. When Ramsay entered the restaurant and took a look at the desserts on offer, he was genuinely impressed. Another rare moment for the series came when the chef inspected the on-site refrigeration area; noticing that everything was stored securely and properly labeled. However, the wheels started coming off once he tasted the restaurant’s main dishes, which he described as undercooked (pizza dough) and not good.

By the time the episode had concluded, the husband and wife who own Amy’s Baking Company had completely come off as inept and unable to absorb any type of criticism. For the first time in the show’s six years, Ramsay decided to give up on attempting to save the diner and ordered his crew to remove all the video recording equipment that is typically set up for the week-long visit in which the chef usually invests quite a bit of time and money into a struggling business in order to save it.

ABC’s Reputation Management

As soon as the show aired last month, news stories and blog posts from around the world surfaced on the Internet; criticizing the company and its methods. Due to an onslaught of negative publicity, ABC decided to temporarily close its doors as it focused on re-branding its food and image. Ironically, bookings soared after the season finale was televised, as customers were eager to dine at the restaurant just to verify for themselves if it was as bad as it appeared on TV (or to witness one of the owners’ meltdowns in person).

After a short commercial was released to the public (ABC hired a PR firm for this), the owners may have thought everything would work itself out and that the flow of customers would continue to be steady, but overnight fame (or infamy in this case) can only peak customers’ curiosity for so long; then you are stuck with the same issues you had prior to so much exposure.

Unfortunately, that’s where Amy’s Baking Company seems to be now – somewhere near the end of an unsuccessful attempt to explain away video footage that is highly conclusive and tends to affirm a viewer’s long-term opinion instantly.

Sadly, the latest queries for Google News show that the most viable option for the company now may be to sign a contract for its own reality show. Due to how many networks focus on drama and problematic situations, the deal could result in the restaurant (and its owners) maintaining their bad habits in order to satisfy a segment of viewers who enjoy watching disorder, yelling, and outlandish behavior regardless of whether it pertains to the food industry.

Only time will tell when it comes to whether Amy’s Baking Company will make a comeback. In this particular situation – with so many members of the public already aware of the restaurant’s actions – it will likely take a long-term effort in order to save the business.

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David Harold

Reputation Consultant at Reputable.com
David Harold began programming as a kid (in Basic) and never lost his passion for computers and technology. Since the 1990s, he has worked extensively with online directories, search engine optimization and most recently Reputation Management. He enjoys discussing social media strategy and assisting individuals as well as companies with their Reputation Management needs. Feel free to contact him anytime if you are in need of assistance with search engine results or have any questions.

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